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Can’t Sleep?

Can't Sleep?

“Is Your iPad Causing Insomnia?”

By Dave From Paleohacks
Creator of the Paleohacks Cookbook

Recently revealed: What the blue light from our screens really does to our bodies…

Do you leave your PC, Mac or TV on in the bedroom, as you drift off to sleep each night? 

Millions of people do–without understanding the dramatic health consequences…

These wonderful devices changing our lives are all the rage.

Yet, they all do something which causes harm in humans. The blue light they emit impairs restful sleep.

How? Exposure prevents the release of melatonin–an essential hormone associated with sleep.

Unfortunately, blue light not only suppresses melatonin production and sleep…

  • It’s considered “carcinogenic pollution”–a recent murine study shows blue light correlates with higher cancer rates…
  • A lack of melatonin is linked to higher rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers, while blocking blue rays with amber glasses is linked to lower cancer rates…
 

Not only is sleep impacted…

  • It also negatively influences thermoregulation, blood pressure and glucose homeostasis…
  • Exposure significantly impacts your own mood…
  • Lower melatonin in mice is linked with higher rates of depression…
  • And blue light exposure may be playing a role in the higher incidence of cataracts and macular degeneration seen today…

How Your Sleep is Compromised

Ordinarily, the pineal gland, a pea-size organ in the brain, begins to release melatonin a couple of hours before your regular bedtime. The hormone is no sleeping pill, but it does reduce alertness, making sleep more inviting.

However, light — particularly of the blue variety — can keep the pineal gland from releasing melatonin, thus warding off sleepiness.

You don’t have to be staring directly at a television or computer screen: If enough blue light hits the eye, the gland can stop releasing melatonin.

The Health Consequences Can 
Be Chronic and Terminal

Not only does this impact melatonin, a growing body of evidence suggests that a desynchronization of circadian rhythms plays significant role in various tumoral diseases, diabetes, obesity, and depression.

So light serves as a cue, but how?

It has long been known that the retina contains two types of photoreceptors, or light sensors: rods and cones. The cones allow us to see colors, while the ultra-sensitive rods are used for night vision, motion detection and peripheral vision.

Surprisingly, neither of them is the body’s primary tool for detecting light and darkness and synchronizing our circadian clocks.

There’s a third kind of sensor in our eyes, officially discovered in 2002. Called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, or ipRGCs, these relatively crude sensors are unable to pick up on low levels of light — from a dim night light, for example — but sluggishly signal light (to read more, click here)

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

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How To Make Scented Candles

How To Make Scented Candles

Are you sick and tired of thinking of the perfect gift to give to your friends on their birthdays? Maybe you want to give something a lot more personalized aside from your homey but boring batches of chocolate chip cookies. You hate the thought of giving out generic gifts because you also very much abhor receiving run-of-the-mill gifts that go straight in your basement. It's high time you learn some do-it-yourself potential gift items that truly make the recipients feel honored to have you as a friend. One time, while I was out shopping, I came across this quaint specialty shop downtown which sells exquisite how-to book on scented candles. The hard-bound book, which include materials for trial, is fairly cheap so I immediately purchased it and went home delighted. The first batch of candles I made wasn't exactly perfect but was good enough to display at my room.

If you're the kind of person who likes romantic candlelight dinner dates or whose idea of relaxation involves quiet reading time by the nook, then the scented ones are for you. These candles come in variety of shapes, sizes and yes, scents that can surely fascinate anyone. Not only are these scented accessories a beauty to behold, they also have the ability to soothe you after a tiring day at work. One has the option to perfume these wax-made products using either synthetic fragrance or essential oils. Both smell terrific but the latter produce more aromatic scents that can generally ease stress. Essential oils, originating from barks and stems of certain plants and flowers like jasmine, lavender, cedar wood, calendula, and lemon grass, lend unique vibrancy and authentic sensuality to a candle. Fragrance oils, on the other hand, are less expensive but also very appealing.

Do scented candles really have certain health benefits or do they also have negative effects on your body? Actually, there are particular kinds or methods of producing candles which are thought of as harmful. Candle experts agree that wicks that are made from metal are dangerous because they often cause lead poisoning and air pollution. Always make sure you purchase a candle made from paper, hemp, or cotton wicks as they are more health and nature-friendly. Beeswax and soy varieties are also safer to use instead of paraffin. When buying questionable products, meticulously ask the vendor about the candle's method of preparation or the ingredients used. Make sure the ones you buy don't have chemical additives. Better yet, do your own ration of the candle. Through personally sourcing the materials and preparing them yourself, you can be assured you're using and giving your loved ones only the best.


Soy wax candles

Soy wax candles are made from hydrogenated soybean oil making them a natural product. Soy wax is a cheaper alternative to using beeswax and creates a long and clean burning candle. Soy wax candles can be combined with different fragrances and essential oils and come in all colors and shapes. There are many benefits to using soy wax when you want to learn how to make candles on your own. Creating soy wax candles is a very satisfying and rewarding hobby.

Some of the advantages of using soy wax to make your own candles include:
·    Soy wax candles produce less soot than paraffin wax candles
·    If you spill some of the soy wax when you are learning how to make soy candles, it is easy to clean up.
·    Soy candles burn at least 50% longer than candles made from paraffin wax
·    Burning candles made from soy wax does not increase the level of carbon dioxide in the air

Any craft store, both online and off, will have the soy candle supplies you need to make your own soy wax candles. Soy jar candles are the easiest to make. All you need to make these soy candles are:
·    1 pound of soy wax
·    1 jar (an ordinary mason jar will do just fine)
·    1 ounce of fragrance oil if you want scented soy candles
·    1 wick suitable for use with soy.
You can find these supplies at a candle making store or you can order them online. There are many retailers on the Internet that will supply you with everything you need to know about how to make soy candles and how to use the supplies. There are also many books available with all kinds of recipes to help you get really creative.

If you want special scents for your soy wax candles, try experimenting with the various fragrance oils. Combining them can often give you the unique scent you want, but it can also give you an odor that you don’t want to have in your soy candles. It is best to mix the oils before you add them to the soy wax so that you don’t have to throw out the whole pot of melted wax. If you use one pound of soy wax, your instructions on how to make soy candles will tell you that you will need to use I fluid ounce of oil to fragrance it.

You can do your one-stop shopping for all your candle making needs at a store that sells soy candle supplies. Here you can get tips on how to decorate your soy wax candles, how to store them and how to get just the right color into the mixture. You can also buy the molds for various types of soy wax candles and pick up books about making other kinds of candles as well.

Click Here To Learn More About Making Candles

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

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Bird Feeders

Bird Feeders

There is estimated to be over 100 billion individual wild birds on earth, and each one needs to eat certain amounts of food on a daily basis in order to survive. That’s where we come in! Bird feeders are fun to make and are essential in order for birds to live. Bird houses can be made out of practically anything and are usually hung in different locations around your yard for birds to enjoy. Purchasing a bird feeder is another option, however this can be expensive and both methods serve practically the same purpose.

The following is a fun and easy way for children (or adults) to make a bird feeder:

What You Will Need:

•    An empty milk or juice carton (any size will do)
•    String (must be strong)
•    Scissors
•    Stapler
•    Hole punch
•    2 small sticks or wooden rods
•    Bird seed
•    Markers, paint or anything which can be used to decorate the carton.  Ensure the paint is water based not to hurt your feathered friends and try not to use anything that can be potentially dangerous to swallow.

Directions:

1.    Wash and dry the carton thoroughly.

2.    Decorate your carton however you would like

3.    Using your scissors cut a square in each side of the carton (a square big enough to fit at least the head of a bird).

4.    Using your hole punch (or your scissors) make a small hole below each square.

5.    Push your sticks or rods through the holes from one side of the carton to the other (the sticks will form a “t”).

6.    Fill the bottom of your carton with bird seed.

7.    Punch a hole (or two if you like) in the top of your carton.

8.    Hang your finished feeder to a tree branch with string.

Although these bird feeders will not last forever (or even close), they are a fun, inexpensive way for children to learn about birds and the importance of caring for our wildlife.

But, if you want some help building your bird feeder CLICK HERE!

Bird House Plans

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Art Theft: Most Famous Cases in History

Review of the most famous cases of art thefts in history including the stealing of the Mona Lisa and The Scream.

Art theft is an ancient and complicated crime. When you look at the some of the most famous cases of art thefts in history, you see thoroughly planned operations that involve art dealers, art fakers, mobsters, ransoms, and millions of dollars. Here you can read about some of the most famous cases of art theft in the history.

The First Theft:
The first documented case of art theft was in 1473, when two panels of altarpiece of the Last Judgment by the Dutch painter Hans Memling were stolen. While the triptych was being transported by ship from the Netherlands to Florence, the ship was attacked by pirates who took it to the Gdansk cathedral in Poland. Nowadays, the piece is shown at the National Museum in Gdansk where it was recently moved from the Basilica of the Assumption.

The Most Famous Theft:
The most famous story of art theft involves one of the most famous paintings in the world and one of the most famous artists in history as a suspect. In the night of August 21, 1911, the Mona Lisa was stolen out of the Louver. Soon after, Pablo Picasso was arrested and questioned by the police, but was released quickly.

It took about two years until the mystery was solved by the Parisian police. It turned out that the 30×21 inch painting was taken by one of the museum employees by the name of Vincenzo Peruggia, who simply carried it hidden under his coat. Nevertheless, Peruggia did not work alone. The crime was carefully conducted by a notorious con man, Eduardo de Valfierno, who was sent by an art faker who intended to make copies and sell them as if they were the original painting.

While Yves Chaudron, the art faker, was busy creating copies for the famous masterpiece, Mona Lisa was still hidden at Peruggias apartment. After two years in which Peruggia did not hear from Chaudron, he tried to make the best out of his stolen good. Eventually, Peruggia was caught by the police while trying to sell the painting to an art dealer from Florence, Italy. The Mona Lisa was returned to the Louver in 1913.

The Biggest Theft in the USA:
The biggest art theft in United States took place at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. On the night of March 18, 1990, a group of thieves wearing police uniforms broke into the museum and took thirteen paintings whose collective value was estimated at around 300 million dollars. The thieves took two paintings and one print by Rembrandt, and works of Vermeer, Manet, Degas, Govaert Flinck, as well as a French and a Chinese artifact.

As of yet, none of the paintings have been found and the case is still unsolved. According to recent rumors, the FBI are investigating the possibility that the Boston Mob along with French art dealers are connected to the crime.

The Scream:
The painting by Edvard Munchs, The Scream, is probably the most sought after painting by art thieves in history. It has been stolen twice and was only recently recovered. In 1994, during the Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway, The Scream was stolen from an Oslo gallery by two thieves who broke through an open window, set off the alarm and left a note saying: thanks for the poor security.

Three months later, the holders of the painting approached the Norwegian Government with an offer: 1 million dollars ransom for Edvard Munchs The Scream. The Government turned down the offer, but the Norwegian police collaborated with the British Police and the Getty Museum to organize a sting operation that brought back the painting to where it belongs.

Ten years later, The Scream was stolen again from the Munch Museum. This time, the robbers used a gun and took another of Munchs painting with them. While Museum officials waiting for the thieves to request ransom money, rumors claimed that both paintings were burned to conceal evidence. Eventually, the Norwegian police discovered the two paintings on August 31, 2006 but the facts on how they were recovered are not known yet.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and/or believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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